Natural refrigerants

Natural refrigerants have no, or an insignificant, effect on the ozone layer and greenhouse effect. They are widely used in smaller applications, such as heating pumps, small chillers, and commercial systems.

For quite some years, natural refrigerants have been the proper thing to use in larger industrial cooling systems within food and beverage industry for both production and storage – especially NH3 and CO2 used for industrial purposes with low temperatures.
Due to the increased focus on the harmful effect of refrigerants on the environment, the natural refrigerants have experienced a renaissance. Today they are widely used in smaller applications, such as heating pumps, small chillers, and commercial systems – and especially the HC types are very common in smaller systems. At present, the most common of these refrigerants are R600a and R717. The typological classification HC stands for HydroCarbon and states the content of atoms in the molecules.

Natural refrigerants have no, or an insignificant, effect on the ozone layer and greenhouse effect. Therefore, everyone is working intensively to incorporate the natural refrigerants in the cooling systems of tomorrow.

Pure substances
R170 Ethan
R290 Prophane
R600a Isobutane
R717 Ammonia
R718 Water
R729 Air
R744 Carbon Dioxide
R1270 Propylene

Mixtures
ODP (Ozone Depletion Potential) states the refrigerants effect on the greenhouse effect compared to a R12 value of 1.0.

GWP (Global Warming Potential) states the refrigerants effect on the greenhouse effect compared to a Carbon Dioxide value of 1.0.





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