Stainless steel 1407

Stainless steel is chromium containing steel alloys, which improves the corrosion resistance of stainless steel. The minimum chromium content in standardised stainless steel is 10.5%.

What is stainless steel?
Stainless steel is chromium containing steel alloys. The minimum chromium content in standardised stainless steel is 10.5%. Chromium improves the corrosion resistance of stainless steel. The higher corrosion resistance is due to a chromium oxide film that is formed on the metal surface. This extremely thin layer is self-repairing under the right conditions.

In general, stainless steel has a higher resistance to chemicals (i.e. acids) than steel and cast iron have. In environments containing chlorides, stainless steel can be attacked by localised corrosion, e.g. pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion.

Austenitic stainless steel
Austenitic stainless steel is the most common type of stainless steel and is characterised by a high corrosion resistance, very good formability, toughness and weld ability. Austenitic stainless steel, especially the EN 1.4301 and EN 1.4401 are used for almost any type of pump components in the industry.

Other alloying elements
Molybdenum, nickel and nitrogen are other examples of typical alloying elements. Alloying with these elements brings out different crystal structures, which enable different properties in connection with machining, forming, welding, corrosion resistance, etc.





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